Kirkcaldy in postcards

Kirkcaldy (kərˈkɔːdi/ kər-kaw-deeKirkcaldyCair Chaladain) is a town and former royal burgh in Fife, on the east coast of Scotland. It is about 11.6 miles (19 km) north of Edinburgh and 27.6 miles (44 km) south-southwest of Dundee. Kirkcaldy has long been nicknamed the Lang Toun Scots for “long town”) in reference to the early town’s 0.9-mile (1.4 km) main street, as indicated on maps of the 16th and 17th centuries. The street later reached a length of nearly 4 miles (6.4 km), connecting the burgh to the neighbouring settlements of Linktown, Pathhead, Sinclairtown and Gallatown, which became part of the town in 1876. The formerly separate burgh of Dysart was merged into Kirkcaldy in 1930. From the early 16th century, the establishment of a harbour at the East Burn confirmed the town’s early role as an important trading port. The town also began to develop around the salt, coal mining and nail making industries. The production of linen which followed in 1672 was later instrumental in the introduction of floorcloth in 1847 by linen manufactuer, Michael Nairn. In 1877 this in turn contributed to linoleum, which became the town’s most successful industry.

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